Tulip fields in Holland

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It’s no secret on this blog that I have a thing for fields of flowers. Canola fields, sunflower fields, lavender fields or even just plain wildflowers bring out the childish urge in me to run, jump and lie in them. So it’s been a goal of mine to add to this list and see the famous tulip fields of Holland. Getting the timing right was the tricky bit, but we knew our time in Europe afforded us this flexibility to catch the next available flight to Amsterdam as soon as the first bulbs of the season bloom. And it sure paid off.

I wish I could clearly describe the sheer joy and exhilaration from spotting the first tulip field from afar. I remember cycling down flat bike lanes, our eyes scanning the horizon for streaks of colour and when a glimpse of one is discovered, shrieks of pleasure can be heard. We pedal faster and literally jump off our bikes to photograph these amazing flowers. We take our time at each field to soak in the beauty before our very eyes, yet knowing that there were many more fields in all colours imaginable to be discovered. The season was heavily in bloom as hyacinths and daffodils were not missing out on the spring party either. We felt unbelievably lucky to have seen at least 50 fields of flowers in full bloom in two days of cycling, no doubt ranking as one of the best times of our lives.

Lavender fields of Provence

IMG_3762 IMG_3795 IMG_3804 IMG_3813 IMG_3930 IMG_3939 IMG_3951 IMG_3961 IMG_3963 IMG_3967We thought we had missed the lavender season in Provence and were slightly disappointed to see cropped fields of what once used to be lavender, until we found these fields close to Sault and Gordes. Seeing these gorgeous purple fields makes us do dangerous things, like pulling up recklessly by the side of the road, narrowly missing ditches and shoving our noses in the lavender bushes despite bees buzzing precariously close to our faces. Oh the joy of traveling and discovering new things. It brings out the kid in us.

Monet’s Garden, Giverny

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The gardens and house where Monet lived in were stunning. Flowers of every colour, shape and size were thriving and in full bloom. Clearly, inspiration is endless here. Some visitors sitting on benches around the water lily pond were sketching away . Even we were inspired to snap away on our cameras.

A little walk around Giverny town offered us more beauty in the way only small French country towns can. Beautiful blooms spilling out over quaint walls of charming houses.Β French shutters on every window. A church on an incline with the simplest of silhouettes.

Visiting the gardens was well worth it and we’re looking forward to exploring the French countryside when we finally leave Paris.

Sea of yellow

One of my absolute favourite thing in the world is a field of flowers, any flower. There’s something wild and free about a field of flowers, and I could watch them forever. Bright yellow canola fields that stretch on for miles into the horizon makes for one memorable country road drive. Definitely one of the best things I’ve seen in my life.